The Tixall Tudor Window Rebuilt (Virtually)

As we posted last month the DBHG have been working on the digital reconstruction for the The Haywood Society of a 16th century Tudor Window from Old Tixall Hall in Staffordshire, England as part of an AHRC and HLF funded collaborative Connected Communities project. The reconstruction is now complete and we thought we'd show you what it looks like. Tixall Hall was the home of the Aston family, who held the title Lord Aston of Forfar. In the 17th century they were staunch Roman Catholics and Tixall was the centre of the local Catholic community. During the Popish Plot of 1678 to 1681 Tixall briefly became notorious as the centre of the alleged conspiracy to kill King Charles II. Tixall Hall was built around 1555 about fifty years after the estate had come into the Aston Family, and from Thomas and Arthur Clifford’s 1817 account of an inscription “on the lower part of a stool of one of the windows” the house was constructed (and possibly designed) by one William Yates (MDLV). The architectural style of the hall is very late domestic gothic (of the period of Henry VII) so may have been considered traditional, if not slightly old fashioned when it was built. Around 1580 a gatehouse was added in a style which shows the influence of the new renaissance architectural ideas that were emerging from Italy and finally making their way into England. There exists an engraving in Robert Plot’s “Natural History of Staffordshire” (1686) which shows the Hall complete with a five sided bay window to the main hall. It’s this bay window which became the focus of the local heritage group, the Haywood Society’s efforts to save the remaining stones and preserve them for posterity.

A close up of part of a print commissioned by Dr. Robert Plot for his book 'Natural History of Staffordshire', published in 1686 which shows Tixall Old Hall at that date and complete. The five sided bay window shown here is the one that has been digitally reconstructed and the image here shows the upper story of timberwork and its roof with five gablets of which nothing now remians. Only some of the masonry from the lower part of the window still exists.

A close up of part of a print commissioned by Dr. Robert Plot for his book 'Natural History of Staffordshire', published in 1686 which shows Tixall Old Hall at that date and complete. The five sided bay window shown here is the one that has been digitally reconstructed and the image here shows the upper story of timberwork and its roof with five gablets of which nothing now remians. Only some of the masonry from the lower part of the window still exists.

 

About Douglas Cawthorne

Project Leader and Principal Investigator for the AHRC Connected Communities Digital Building Heritage project at De Montfort University.
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